Culture

Origami – Paper models (Part 2)

In Japan, you can buy origami papers at the convenient stores. You don’t really need to walk far as all convenient stores are located near the stations and at every corner of the street or building. An alternative place to buy origami papers is the bookstore or stationery shop.
Here, I’ll be showing you some of the famous paper models in Japanese origami.
Tsuru [ 鶴 ]

Tsuru

The paper crane is the most well known origami model in Japan. You may see it in the Japanese temples, restaurants table decorations or murals on the walls. This model was mentioned in the non-fiction story of ‘Sadako and the Thousand Paper Cranes’ which took place during the Second World War. It was believed that if you could complete one thousand paper cranes origami within one year, you might be granted one wish by a crane.
Ugoku-Haato [ 動くハート ]

Heart in a box

This beating heart is a favorite among lovers. You may see lots of them during special occasions like Valentine’s Day or White Day in Japan. If you are wondering what ‘White Day’ means in Japan, that’s another story for another day!
Hakucho [ 白鳥 ]

Swan

This is a swan paper model which is often used as decorations at weddings or anniversary. It symbolizes eternal love, elegance and gracefulness.
Penguin [ ペンギン ]

Penguin

Uma [ 馬 ]

Horse

I did all the above paper models just for fun. Following the instructions to make a paper model is easy but when you want to make something more sophisticated like the model below. You’ll probably need to learn more about the mathematics of paper folding. The model below is made by a friend who is excellent in mathematics and origami.

A more sophisticated model made by a friend

If you want to learn more about Origami, here’s a link to an Origami Center in Ochanomizu. Origami workshops for foreigners are available too.


  
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About Angeline

Angeline has been in Japan for over 12 years. Currently working as a Business English Instructor, her interest/hobby are photography, strolling, cultural events, historical sites.

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